Benefits of creating a treatment plan

By Sarah Earles, MS, LPC, NCC | August 11, 2023 

You did your intake paperwork. You met with your therapist and told them why you came to counseling. Now they want you to help them make a treatment plan? What’s that? What’s its purpose? Do you really need one?

A treatment plan is a document that is unique to the helping relationship. Technically, it is a medical document since counseling is a healthcare service provided by a “qualified” professional (Law Insider, n.d.). The treatment plan states the client’s name, the date the plan is made, goals for services, and treatment interventions. At Arizona Family Counseling, the treatment plan contains the person or family’s vision and hopes for the future as well as a list of strengths and resources that can help achieve the vision. At the bottom of the treatment plan, there is a place for the client and therapist to sign that they are in agreement with the plan. The plan is usually about one page long and is good for up to one year.

What is the treatment plan for, though? The treatment plan is a tool that is used to help you create focus. It helps keep you and your therapist accountable for the time you spend in therapy. If there is a third-party-payer, such as an insurance company, it helps reflect the necessity and nature of services provided. The treatment plan also helps you and your therapist see growth towards, as well as attainment of, goals (Davis, 2021). The treatment plan is ultimately designed to be a helping document, just as counseling is designed to be a helping relationship.

Do you really have to have a treatment plan? Yes. If you receive services from a licensed counselor at licensed agency, you will need a treatment plan. It helps keep the therapist organized and accountable (My Clients Plus, n.d.). The treatment plan helps ensure that you receive the care you deserve and protects both you and the provider from potential fraud, abuse, and waste (Good Therapy, 2019). Again, the treatment plan is designed to be helpful.

What’s a treatment plan? It’s a necessary part of getting the support you need through counseling. If you have questions about the treatment plan, please ask your therapist, and he or she can help you. If you want to change your treatment plan, please also talk to your therapist. They are there to help and the treatment plan is ultimately about you!

Recommended Reads

Father Baby Connection. Happy Black Man Bonding With Infant Child At Home
Successful Parenting: How Can It Be Defined?
Parenting is hard. Parents can try to shape the life of a child but they cannot control their child’s...
Read More
upset african american kid looking at camera in kindergarten
Ten Reasons A Child May Be Dysregulated
Children's persistent dysregulation, marked by outbursts, can stem from factors like sleep deprivation,...
Read More

You did your intake paperwork. You met with your therapist and told them why you came to counseling. Now they want you to help them make a treatment plan? What’s that? What’s its purpose? Do you really need one?

A treatment plan is a document that is unique to the helping relationship. Technically, it is a medical document since counseling is a healthcare service provided by a “qualified” professional (Law Insider, n.d.). The treatment plan states the client’s name, the date the plan is made, goals for services, and treatment interventions. At Arizona Family Counseling, the treatment plan contains the person or family’s vision and hopes for the future as well as a list of strengths and resources that can help achieve the vision. At the bottom of the treatment plan, there is a place for the client and therapist to sign that they are in agreement with the plan. The plan is usually about one page long and is good for up to one year.

What is the treatment plan for, though? The treatment plan is a tool that is used to help you create focus. It helps keep you and your therapist accountable for the time you spend in therapy. If there is a third-party-payer, such as an insurance company, it helps reflect the necessity and nature of services provided. The treatment plan also helps you and your therapist see growth towards, as well as attainment of, goals (Davis, 2021). The treatment plan is ultimately designed to be a helping document, just as counseling is designed to be a helping relationship.

Do you really have to have a treatment plan? Yes. If you receive services from a licensed counselor at licensed agency, you will need a treatment plan. It helps keep the therapist organized and accountable (My Clients Plus, n.d.). The treatment plan helps ensure that you receive the care you deserve and protects both you and the provider from potential fraud, abuse, and waste (Good Therapy, 2019). Again, the treatment plan is designed to be helpful.

What’s a treatment plan? It’s a necessary part of getting the support you need through counseling. If you have questions about the treatment plan, please ask your therapist, and he or she can help you. If you want to change your treatment plan, please also talk to your therapist. They are there to help and the treatment plan is ultimately about you!

Recommended Reads

Mom and her child daughter are playing at home. Cute girl are holding paper mustache on stick. Family holiday and togetherness.
What is the Magic Mustache?
The “magic mustache” is a Trust-Based Relational Intervention technique used to help with self-regulation....
Read More
Emotions can cause reaction which will have consequences.
Emotions, Reactions and Consequences
Gaining awareness about emotions, and reactions and consequences will help address the root of a behavior,...
Read More

References

Davis, S. (2021, July 5). The importance of a treatment plan with your mental health provider. CPTSD Foundation. https://cptsdfoundation.org/2021/07/05/the-importance-of-a-treatment-plan-with-your-mental-health-provider/

My Clients Plus. (n.d.). Elements of a clear counseling treatment plan. https://myclientsplus.com/elements-of-a-clear-counseling-treatment-plan/

Good Therapy. (2019). Treatment plan. https://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/psychpedia/treatment-plan

Law Insider. (n.d.). Counseling services. https://www.lawinsider.com/dictionary/counseling-services

 

References

Davis, S. (2021, July 5). The importance of a treatment plan with your mental health provider. CPTSD Foundation. https://cptsdfoundation.org/ 2021/07/05/the-importance-of-a-treatment-plan-with-your-mental-health-provider/

My Clients Plus. (n.d.). Elements of a clear counseling treatment plan. https://myclientsplus.com/elements-of-a-clear-counseling-treatment-plan/

Good Therapy. (2019). Treatment plan. https://www.goodtherapy.org/ blog/psychpedia/treatment-plan

Law Insider. (n.d.). Counseling services. https://www.lawinsider.com/ dictionary/counseling-services